All posts filed under: Joint Hypermobility

What is Joint Hypermobility versus Hypermobility Syndrome?

‘For these people, hypermobility may even be considered an advantage, for example, athletes, gymnasts, dancers and musicians might specifically be selected because of their extra range of movement. For a small percentage of the population, however, instead of being advantageous, hypermobility may be associated with joint and ligament injuries, pain, fatigue and other symptoms’ (Hakim A – www.hypermobility.org). The exact cause(s) of joint hypermobility is unknown; however, “loose joints” are believed to be caused by various mutations to one or more of the components that help build our connective tissues. Research is suggesting that both genetic and epigenetic factors play a role in the presentation signs and symptoms, as well as the severity of issues associated with joint hypermobility. In some individuals, joint hypermobility is an indication of a type of hypermobility syndrome, such as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome – hypermobility type (EDS-HT). Hypermobility syndromes are classified as heritable connective tissue disorders or connective tissue diseases. There are several types of hypermobility syndromes. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a type of hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome – Hypermobility …

Pictures from EDS Wellness’ 2nd Mind-Body Class for Hypermobility and Chronic Pain

A few pictures from our 2nd Mind-Body class for Hypermobility today. We discussed wrist, neck and ankle issues, how to practice yoga safely with Hypermobility, proper form in specific poses, things to look for when practicing yoga, the use of props, and finished with a gentle flow yoga practice. Professional pictures by Christina Maldonado Photography    

Splits, Hypermobility and Yoga

Splits – not something I usually do in Yoga, not because they are hard, but because they are way too easy for me.   If you are hypermobile, splits can be super easy and done (or very close) with little effort – that’s not always a good thing. It may seem like a yogi dream, but many of the issues that can or may go along with hypermobility are not so great. Unfortunately, hypermobility has mistakenly been glorified in many sports, including dance, gymnastics, ice skating, and more. Yoga is much the same, but times are changing – thankfully because many of us were told not to do yoga and that yoga is dangerous if you have joint hypermobility, which is often caused by an underlying connective tissue disorder such as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). There are several types of EDS, and also several other heritable conditions that affect the connective tissues and cause hypermobility – Marfan Syndrome is one, as is Williams Syndrome, Sticklers Syndrome, and Osteogenesis Imperfecta. There are also several types of hypermobility …

Fluid Retention, Joint Hypermobility, and My Knees

I can tell you all this – I’ve had issues with fluid retention like this off and on for years. It’s not always dependent on a reaction, but I do get swelling then to. This is swelling that is just there and is hard for anyone to see other than me, but you see it off and on, there’s a clear diff of about 5-10 lbs and it happens fast. It’s also everywhere, but specifically affects my legs and arms. And both places aren’t where I gain weight quickly. My legs yes, but that’s on my hips, the water retention and what my skin looks like happens on my legs above my knees and I don’t have fat there. It’s the craziest thing bc I used to think it was bc I ate too much of sweets, but when it comes off, it comes off fast – like in a day. I can suddenly see muscles that I thought I lost (I workout often also) and my skin looks different. I have learned that too …

Yoga Therapy at Any Age?

Earlier today, I saved an article to read later. The article that I saved was about an 85-year old woman, living with severe osteoporosis and a terrible hunch back, who made incredible progress in her posture and pain through yoga. Tonight, after YTT (Yoga Instructor Training),  I finally had the chance to read the article I saved. I love this article for so many reasons — it made me think of my Gram, who suffered for years with chronic pain due to undiagnosed Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and who also suffered from severe kyphosis, scoliosis, and osteoporosis — all due to EDS also. Smoking two packs of cigarettes a day, and her lack of movement of any kind, didn’t help either. Of course, any article sharing the story of someone who has enjoyed great success through yoga, and the personal care and instruction of a knowledgeable yoga teacher, is pertinent to me because of being in YTT. However, these stories are also important because they share hope, strength, and the focus is often on the body’s amazing …

Yoga and The Hypermobile Yogi

Yoga and The Hypermobile Yogi – Managing Chronic Pain and Stabilizing Joints with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS)   “Yoga is dangerous for EDS.” “I was told not to do yoga.” “Yoga will make you end up in a wheelchair.”  I’m sure that you’ve heard all these phrases before, and many people feel that that all three are absolute truths. While we all are entitled to our opinions, the fact is there is no black and white factual statement that has come out about doing yoga when you have Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. Usually, our ideas stem from personal beliefs, from what we have been told by someone we trust, or from our experiences with yoga. We are all different, and the truth is what works for someone else, does not work for you and vice versa. This applies to the practice of yoga. There are countless people with hypermobility/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, who have been practicing yoga for years and have done well. There are also those who tried it and did not have the strength, nor were self-aware enough to know …